Have Diabetes?

Why Weight Loss helps Diabetics?

All Natural, . The Future


Diabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, foot and leg amputations and blindness.
Losing weight when you have type 2 diabetes can improve your health and help you feel better overall. The American Diabetes Association® says that losing weight can help1:

• Lower blood sugar
• Reduce blood pressure
• Improve cholesterol levels
• Lighten the stress on hips, knees, ankles, and feet

They also have better blood sugar control, improved quality of life and fewer hospitalizations, and they take less medication, thus reducing medical costs.
Heavy people with type 2 diabetes who lose a modest amount of weight and keep it off get many long-term health benefits such as reducing their risk of chronic kidney disease, depression and eye disease, according to the latest findings of a landmark study.
There’s no question about it: If you’re overweight and have type 2 diabetes, dropping pounds is incredibly important to your health. But why is weight loss crucial for people with diabetes, and what are its long-term benefits?

Who Gets Type 2 Diabetes?
Anyone can get type 2 diabetes. But those at highest risk for the disease are those who:

  • Are over 45
  • Are obese or overweight
  • Have had gestational diabetes 
  • Have family members who have type 2 diabetes
  • Have prediabetes
  • Don’t exercise
  • Have low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Are members of certain racial or ethnic groups

Type 2 diabetes, once called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 90% to 95% of the 26 million Americans with diabetes.

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?
Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes make insulin. But either their pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin well enough. This is called insulin resistance. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can’t get into the body’s cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body’s cells are not able to function properly. Other problems associated with the buildup of glucose in the blood include:
Damage to the body. Over time, the high glucose levels in the blood can damage the nerves and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart and lead to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries that can cause heart attack and stroke.

Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination, causing dehydration.

Diabetic coma (hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma). When a person with type 2 diabetes becomes very ill or severely dehydrated and is not able to drink enough fluids to make up for the fluid losses, they may develop this life-threatening complication.

Type 2 Diabetes in Children
More and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Find out about type 2 diabetes symptoms in children, the diagnosis, and the treatment of type 2 diabetes in childhood. If your child is at risk for childhood diabetes, it’s important to learn specific self-care tips to help prevent diabetes.
Will exercise help my diabetes?
Exercise is very beneficial in the management of type 2 diabetes. Always consult with your doctor about exercise guidelines, to exercise safely and reduce risks.

Losing weight can have a big impact on diabetes. Although it might not cure type 2 diabetes in every case, getting to a healthy body weight does have that potential for many people. Even if it doesn’t completely cure the disease, losing weight may make it possible for people with diabetes to take less medication. It often helps manage or prevent some of the health problems that can come with diabetes, too.

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. This happens because of a problem with the hormone called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas — a gland located just behind the stomach. When you eat, the pancreas releases insulin into your bloodstream. The insulin allows sugar to enter your cells, lowering the amount of sugar in your blood.

If you have type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or your body cannot use insulin as well as it should. So sugar cannot move into your cells. Instead, it builds up in your blood.

The reason why type 2 diabetes develops is not completely clear. But being overweight plays a role. In people who are overweight, the body sometimes needs as much as two to three times more insulin than it would if it was at a healthy weight. In those who develop diabetes, that is more insulin than the pancreas is able to produce.

When the pancreas tries to make that much insulin, it is pushed beyond its capacity and insulin-producing cells start to die. That makes the situation worse because the pancreas then has even fewer cells with which to make insulin. Compounding the problem, research also has shown that fat cells of people who are obese and who have more abdominal fat actually release molecules that can be harmful to the pancreas. So the more abdominal fat you have, the higher the risk of damage to your pancreas.

Getting to a lower weight reduces many of these problems. When you weigh less, your pancreas is better able to keep up with your body’s need for insulin. In some cases, weight loss is enough to restore blood sugar to a normal level, which eliminates diabetes. Even if it doesn’t get your blood sugar completely back to normal, it may lower your need for insulin therapy or other medications to control diabetes. It also lessens your risk for other serious complications of diabetes, including heart problems, kidney disease and nerve damage.
The benefits of healthy weight as it relates to diabetes continue over time, too. Many people mistakenly believe that a person’s risk for diabetes automatically goes up with age. In fact, your diabetes risk rises over time only if you gain weight and are less active as you age. For those who stay fit, the risk of developing diabetes remains the same or increases only slightly.

For those with a family history of diabetes, weight control is critical. Research has shown that people who have a family history of type 2 diabetes are more vulnerable to developing type 2 diabetes themselves. Staying at a healthy weight lowers their chances of getting the disease by about 70 to 90 percent.

In general, healthy weight is defined as a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or lower. To get there, you don’t need to run marathons or do hours of workouts each day. But you do need to be active on a regular basis. If you are interested in losing weight, talk to your doctor about an exercise and diet program that best fits your needs.